View & Vote on Sites

Sites Worth Saving

The Historical Society greatly appreciates your support. However, we request that the public respect the owners' privacy by not revealing any personal information on this website, by visiting the sites, or by contacting the owners. These sites were nominated by the public and not by the owners themselves. As far as we know, none of these properties are currently for sale.

Anonymous
12:59 PM
09/01/2009

My second choice is probably the most important historical building from our gold mining days.

Karen S
01:17 PM
09/01/2009

Again, it has historic value to me and sentimental value. My ancestors came over from mining tin in England to work in the Franklin Creighton gold mine. This would be my second choice. Canton Elementary my first choice

Brent R
04:42 PM
09/01/2009

What an amazing, unique building. Losing it would be a huge loss to the heritage of those whose families worked at the mine.

Jeannine L
07:26 PM
09/01/2009

This building has so many stories to tell.
It held such hope for those who came to this area. Gold was mined from this site for approximately 70 years!!
"...used as a commissary, offices, post office, boarding house, and a small stamp mill where local residents could sell gold ore" WOW

Carla B
07:41 PM
09/01/2009

This site is essential as we tell Cherokee County's story to future generations.

Jimmy M
01:01 AM
09/02/2009

The Shingle House has long been a symbol in the community. It served as the gold mine office for the Creighton Gold Mines and as Post Office foe the community. Very near here is Andrew's Chapel cemetery, which has some stories of it's own to tell.

Jimmy M
01:27 AM
09/02/2009

Re: Comment by Jimmy M at 01:01 AM on 09/02/2009:
Followup: We, Historical Society of Forsyth County, are currently working with Forsyth Co. to include all identified cemeteries with GPS readings of their locations be placed on county maps. Also in the works is to include all of the old communities on county maps.

Susan S
08:26 AM
09/02/2009

The Georgia Gold Rush is an important piece of Cherokee County History and this structure needs to be preserved.

Anonymous
08:32 AM
09/02/2009

That gold was mined in this area is a little known fact for those living outside the area and the house should be saved both as a monument to that era and for the type construction it is.

Anonymous
03:53 PM
09/03/2009

I remember this from when I was a little girl and I'm almost a senior now. My mother told me of this place also when she was younger, a lot of old, good memories. please keep.

Janet J
06:48 PM
09/07/2009

This would be an awesome educational site, and needs preserved.

Zack J
06:54 PM
09/07/2009

Old buildings like this need saved.

Anonymous
09:09 PM
09/07/2009

All need to be saved

Anonymous
07:32 AM
09/09/2009

Anonymous
08:12 AM
09/09/2009

This site seems to be in the most eminant danger and is the oldest structure on the list and therfore deserves the most attention.

Glenda C
12:46 PM
09/09/2009

Definitely a part of history that needs to be saved.

Hazel C
02:36 PM
09/09/2009

Age of structure and being a part of the Gold Mine history.

Anonymous
03:00 PM
09/09/2009

It is FABULOUS! The structure, the history, the significance to the county's development. Let's save it!

Anonymous
05:11 PM
09/09/2009

This is an important part of Cherokee County history, as it relates to the former gold mines in Cherokee and nearby counties.

Kathy P
07:35 PM
09/09/2009

Finding gold and winning the lottery: fantasies of the past and present. Isn't everyone curious about what happened to the winners?

Anonymous
09:50 PM
09/09/2009

The historical significance of the building

Ann L
08:50 AM
09/10/2009

This is a beautiful, unique building that recollects a seminal period in Georgia's history - the gold rush that settled North Georgia and was the last nail in the coffin for the state's Cherokee Indians, driving them west.

KATHY H
12:28 PM
09/10/2009

Very little evidence of Gold being found in Cherokee remains. The old mines have been lost to developers, this structure needs to be saved as a testament of our past. The building has seen many uses and should be saved.

art n
02:13 PM
09/10/2009

One of the more historic sites in Cherokee.

Anonymous
03:35 PM
09/10/2009

This building tells a wonderful story about the gold mining era. Please lets don't lose this one.

Bob F
05:21 PM
09/10/2009

People don't realize that the largest gold nugget found in the State of Georgia was found in Cherokee County. I do not know where the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) houses the nugget today. It use to be kept at the Georgia Department of Agriculture when DNR shared space in tht Department of Agriculture Building across from the State Capital years ago.

Anonymous
03:06 PM
09/11/2009

Only remains of gold mining operation in the county

J A
04:51 PM
09/11/2009

My grandfather was a miner here and owned property very close by. There is a very interesting and tragic story regarding one of the mine owners I believe, when his new bride came. Something about the horse being spooked, reared and killed the bride. Has anyone else heard this story? Maybe you could post it as well. and I did a photo shoot here in the 70's. Incredible property to preserve. I vote yes.

Anonymous
06:26 PM
09/11/2009

This bulding is a landmark in the area and a significant historical site which needs immediate attention before it is too late to preserve it. It was in sight of my parent's home and is the center of many stories about the Crecght on Gold Mines. My first choice.

Sheila B
07:39 PM
09/11/2009


My aunt and uncle (Sam & Bonnie Leslie) lived across the river, I was there a lot, my second home. Loved the area there, would hate to see it disappear. Old memories there and a lot of history. We need to preserve our history.
Thanks

Anonymous
09:55 PM
09/11/2009

I see people stopping to take pictures all the time. Needs to be preserved and an historical marker installed.

Steve G
04:46 AM
09/12/2009

My great grandfather worked for the mining company driving a mule team in and out of the mines. He, like the other workers, was out of the mine having lunch when the mine tunnel gave way to the river. I've been told that the only loss of that day was a team of mules that was in the shaft. Any more stories ?

Harry A
12:23 PM
09/12/2009

a REAL business site

Jennifer B
06:50 PM
09/12/2009

Re: Comment by J A at 04:51 PM on 09/11/2009:
The story is that John Moore,second husband of Ann Pascoe Moore,was attempting to ford the Etowah River (then called the Hightower River) when it was in the flood stage. His team of horses became tangled in their harness and in trying to cut them loose, he became entangled, fell into the water and drowned. Ann was my grandmother's great, great grandmother. Ann Moore's first husband drowned at sea while serving in the English Navy.

judy t
04:08 PM
09/13/2009

my grandmother attended this one room school house. future generations need to realize the sacrifices that were made by our grandparents to receive there education.

Anonymous
08:02 PM
09/13/2009

It is a part of the history of gold mining.
Should be preserved

Lori M
04:45 PM
09/14/2009

This structure really needs help

Jennifer S
10:18 PM
09/15/2009

This site seems the closest to preserving not only Cherokee County history but Georgia history with the best "feel" and context of the area itself.

JACK F
01:43 PM
09/16/2009

Beautiful style old design shoulr be a museum charging admission with the family living on the second floor.

Hannah M
08:18 AM
09/17/2009

This is such an iconic Cherokee County landmark. It is such a beautiful, stark reminder of bygone days. It is like art - it doesn't really serve any purpose except to stand there and add to the sceenery of Yellow Creek Road, but it would be such a shame to see it torn down. The area wouldn't be the same - we'd all have to sing "Goodbye, Yellow Creek Road..."

Debra F
09:10 AM
09/18/2009

This site is important as part of Cherokee County's history.

Anonymous
04:23 PM
09/21/2009

My grandfather worked at the Creighton gold mine early in his lifetime and shared many stories about the history of the mine.

Anonymous
08:48 AM
09/25/2009

This is one of the most historical sites in Cherokee County! It is definitely worth preserving. Wasn't it at one time used as a trading post owned by an Indian?

Andrew I
02:01 PM
09/26/2009

Just a beautiful building. I drive by it on the way to River Bend Gun Club all the time.

Andrea W
11:20 PM
09/26/2009

My Granny used to live in this house!!

Anonymous
07:03 AM
09/27/2009

Beautiful building and wonderful history. Does need much work but is such a great piece of our Gold Rush history.

Linda B
12:42 PM
09/27/2009

Last remaining building from a long-forgotten and little known gold mining operation.

Anonymous
08:40 AM
09/28/2009

To insure that the history of gold mining in Cherokee is not lost.

Anonymous
10:08 PM
09/28/2009

This site should be preserved for the gold mining historical significance in Cherokee County.

Malinda C
04:32 PM
10/01/2009

My Great aunt Jane Puriett told me she and her father built this house.

Anonymous
09:19 AM
10/02/2009

I didn't even know there was a gold mine in Cherokee County. It's an interesting story and a great building!

Charlotte S
06:38 PM
10/05/2009

The 'Yellow Rock' caused a great deal of human pain -- the greed of the white man! Burn it down--

Linda B
11:26 AM
10/06/2009

It is important History!

Karen S
09:55 AM
10/12/2009

This is my second choice.

Anonymous
02:20 PM
10/12/2009

This is one of the oldest structures in our county that remains standing.

Anonymous
02:54 PM
10/12/2009

we need to save a bit of are areas history.

Jennifer B
04:04 PM
10/12/2009

This is an important piece of our county's history.

Anonymous
09:20 PM
10/12/2009

Historical value, museum potential, last remaining of its type.

Joan B
10:08 PM
10/12/2009

I lived in the Pascoe House across the Etowah for 12 years, and I wrote research papers about the Franklin Gold Mine and the land-lots given after the Cherokee Indians were removed from the area. Lots of history, and this is the only site left. What a shame to let it go.

Karen S
03:25 PM
10/14/2009

My second choice. Many reasons for saving this structure and my family has ties to the area, which makes it dearer to me.

Karen S
10:01 AM
10/15/2009

Still my 2nd choice

Anonymous
04:50 PM
02/27/2010

Re: Comment by Joan B at 10:08 PM on 10/12/2009:
Is the Pascoe House still standing?

jon c
04:50 PM
02/27/2010

Re: Comment by Joan B at 10:08 PM on 10/12/2009:
Is the Pascoe House still standing?

Anonymous
06:26 PM
04/04/2010

Re: Comment by Joan B at 10:08 PM on 10/12/2009:

Joan, I would love to read your research papers on the Franklin/Ceighton mine and the Cherokee Indians. It's difficult to find much information on either topic. I have recently researched information on the mine and have found very little general info. Please give me a call or email me your research info.. These two topic fascinates me. Thank you, Tammy

Anonymous
10:54 PM
10/13/2010

Re: Comment by Anonymous at 04:23 PM on 09/21/2009:
my kin people are decendencts of samuel and john pascoe of that came from cornwall england they were copper miners that migrated to georgia in different ways when they reached american shores founded the pascoe and creighton mines he built the old house across the river if your looking north on the left he died from mercury poisening

pamela p
09:14 PM
10/30/2010

Re: Comment by Jennifer B at 06:50 PM on 09/12/2009:
@ jennifer b
Ann Pascoe is the sister to my great great grandfather James Pascoe. It is my understanding that the plantation house was built by brother John Pascoe but he died from mercury poisoning proir to residing in the home 1856. Brother Samuel Pascoe was willed the property.
My great grandmother is Mary Elizabeth Pascoe Parker, Marion County Arkansas.

pamela w
09:32 PM
10/30/2010

Re: Comment by Joan B at 10:08 PM on 10/12/2009:
I am very interested in the history of the Pascoe family, the mines and the Pascoe house. Do u have photos. My great grandmother is Mary Elizabeth Pascoe Parker, daughter to James and niece of John and Samuel Pascoe. It is my family history that Johns grave is hidden on the property after being dug up several times by grave robbers at the rumor of buried gold. I have other stories as well...would love to share!

Anonymous
10:42 AM
11/09/2010

Re: Comment by pamela w at 09:32 PM on 10/30/2010:
Hey there. You’ve got some very cool blog here, great article. I learned so much from this article. Thank you for the information that I got because they are really helpful. I love the blog and hope to read more of these from the author! Nice job! God Bless:-)

Pat S
01:28 PM
10/19/2011

Re: Comment by pamela w at 09:32 PM on 10/30/2010:
we are decendants of Samuel and Mary Pascoe and would like to exchange information and history with anyone who has any info @ the mines or grave sites. ANYTHING PERTAINING TO THE PASCOES WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.

Violetrae H
12:51 AM
12/15/2011

Re: Comment by Pat S at 01:28 PM on 10/19/2011:
If you would like to know more about the family. I have my aunt dulice's book and you may join us at facebook: violetrae Hillhouse And: Hillhouse connection. there is much we can tell you.

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